Divine Mercy and the Eternal Dawn

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The Divine Mercy festivities were well attended on Sunday at Our Lady of Ephesus House of Prayer in Jamaica, Vermont. I spoke to about 120 people on the mystery of Easter and Divine Mercy.

One thing I pointed out is how revelations of Our Lord to Saint Faustina about the Feast of Mercy utilizes time. We all know about the chaplet and the Hour of Mercy. Well, the Novena to the Divine Mercy leading up to the Feast begins on Good Friday, the historical Hour of Mercy, which in turn is part of the Easter Triduum that culminates the Season of Lent and begins the Season of Easter. The Feast itself comes on the Octave Day of Easter as a kind of grand finale of the Paschal mysteries as they are liturgically celebrated. All of these periods of time are pointing the the eternal Easter of paradise and solemnize our participation in the Redemptive and Eucharistic Sacrifices. Our hope is Easter, even as now we are more often in Lent and in the Hour of Mercy, the Hour of Suffering.

Our Lord points out to Saint Faustina that now is the Time of Mercy–now, as we continue to breathe. Beyond the veil of death, where time will end, there is no mercy, only justice. for God is a just judge, who will render to every man according to his works (Romans 2:6). The Message of Divine Mercy is supposed to instill confidence in all of us, but we need to understand the dimensions and character of Divine Mercy.

One day the sun will set on time for all of us. We continue to repeat the cycles of time, not only every year, but every week and day. The seven day cycle of the week beginning on Sunday, repeats over and over. The Day of the Lord where we give to God the first fruits of our lives looks foward to Our Lord’s second coming, when the seven day cycle of time will come to an end, and a new day will dawn, an Eighth Day that will never end. The ancient roman baptismal fonts were all octagonal, calling to mind our birth into new life, a life which looks forward to the bliss of eternity.

Each evening when the sun sets, we all lay down to sleep in a dress rehearsal for death and the Church prays: May the all powerful Lord, grant us a restful night and a peaceful death. Our sleep looks forward to the dawn and our hearts yearn for the final dawn of the Eternal Day.

Lord, for the sake of your sorrowful passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Here is a group shot with yours truly on the left, and then Don and Mary Tarinelli, the founders of the House of Prayer, with Father Marco Hurtado, priest of the Diocese of Newark, NJ, and Fra Solanus in the front and Fra Didacus all the way on the right.

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It was a great grace to be invited by Don and Mary to preach. I highly recommend a visit to Our Lady’s House, you won’t be disappointed. It was also a pleasure to meet Fr. Marco and spend some time with him.

Here are couple of great photographs that Fra Didacus took. (He really is a camera bug!) The first is the replica of Our Lady’s House in Ephesus and the second is the lighted Cross on the House of Prayer property. Click on the thumbnail. I uploaded a larger file, since it is such and awesome photo.

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Father Angelo Against the World

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That’s me on the pillar! Off to Vermont to stay at Our Lady of Ephesus House of Prayer. At the end of my retreat there back in November, Mary Tarinelli invited me to preach at the yearly Divine Mercy Day that Her and her husband Don sponsor. I plan to get in a little day of recollection in on Monday. Be back soon.

Meanwhile here is the AirMaria interview with Mary about the House of Prayer.

Actually, my habit is not that ragged.